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Your Good Work Isn't Enough

Marc Scheff works with people to design lives beyond what they think is possible. As a child he saw first hand what shifts in perspective and mindset can create even against difficult odds. He now dedicates his time to working with high-level creators and entrepreneurs to create well beyond the success they've had and into the success they've dreamed about.

 
Executive Contributor Marc Scheff

You’re in the business of building relationships. Start acting like it. What most schools don’t tell you when you’re becoming a full-time artist, or coach, is that you’re not becoming either of those things. You’re becoming a business, and you have to learn those skills as much as any other. And your business runs on relationships.


Person having bad day at work and showing bad emotion

Sharing your work isn't interesting

When I taught business basics to artists, we covered things like forming an LLC, taxes, how to set up your bank accounts and credit cards so taxes were easy, expense tracking, networking, scheduling, avoiding burnout, and of course the all-important self-promotion.


We had a clear rule for social media sharing


  • 70% share your things

  • 20% share the things your friends are doing

  • 10% share things you love


What’s wild about this is that the 70% too often doesn’t do much. People expect you to share your offers, services, wild results, and amazing deals. We’ve all been desensitized by the algorithm which serves up so many ads, you probably scroll by dozens or more of these posts in a single sitting.


Why your work won't stand out

You have to share your stuff. Have to. And no matter how vulnerable or revealing your work is about who you are, it’s not everything. And it’s expected.


In a world where doom scrolling is synonymous with tuning-out, it’s bland. Plus, great work is everywhere.


According to the ICF, in 2024


“There are currently 51,718* coaches in 143 countries and territories who hold one of three ICF Credentials”1


And some statistics show 99% “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their experience with credentialed coaches.


You can dig up similar numbers for almost any industry. You’re not alone and your work isn’t enough to stand out.


Why your passions will stand out

The more “personal” shares, those hit.


And the truth is, that makes sense because in a world where we can have everything, everywhere, all at once, the only thing that separates you from anyone else is what and how you love.


On my own facebook feed, I’ve been sharing art and growth habits for 15 years, maybe more. The posts that generate the most engagement, the most messages, the most value for people, are always the ones that touch on the personal. And personal isn’t just the hard to talk about stuff, it’s often stuff like how much you love the latest movie, your kids, or a local restaurant.


Why? One word: relationships.


Think about anything you’ve done that you feel was a success. I’ll put dollars to donuts that part of what made it work was a relationship. You may have been challenged and supported by a conversation with a partner, a trusted friend or colleague, an investor, a client, or a referral. All of these gifts of knowledge came from a relationship where someone knows you beyond the

tag-lines and great work.


And how did those relationships build? Through slowly more and more connection over things you love.


Take my work as a coach. Most people reach out to me not because of my certifications or sharing wins on social media. They find me because of my passion for creativity, or the way I find humor in parenting, my commitment to my jiu jitsu practice, and occasionally over my feelings on the latest trends or media.


None of those things by themselves make me a great coach. But the work I’ve done to become a great coach in combination with a connection over a personal passion, is a magic formula for attracting the kind of people who see you and want to see more.


Examples: How to share what you love

If you share something that you just love whether it’s a new movie or taco joint, you’re sharing more about what actually makes you tick, and that matters.


I follow a few newsletters I love. They’re both popular and thought provoking. AND the balance they hit with sharing what they love draws me in.


Three in particular are built around the ideas above, and they all kill it. If you want great examples of how to talk just the right amount about you, and in praise of others, here are some of the best examples.


  1. Terri Trespicio TEDx speaker, author, and course-leader, Terri has a fantastic newsletter where you will get new ideas every week. Every Friday Terri sends out three of her favorite things. From hair care to self care to great books. I love seeing what she’s up to and getting to know her and myself more.


  1. Austin Kleon Austin is almost 100% sharing stuff he loves. If there’s anyone in the world who loves writing, music, and the visual arts, I’m sure I haven’t heard of them. Austin is maybe best known for his series of books, Steal Like an Artist, Show Your Work, and Keep going. I’m such a fan of his excitement that I even got the t-shirt.


  1. James Clear I had the distinct honor of interviewing James Clear when his book, Atomic Habits, hit the shelves. Now with a mailing list over 3M strong, he shares quotes and ideas from others that inspired him that week. Every now and then he’ll talk about his best selling book or killer new app. But it’s in the sharing that forms the connection.


  1. And if you want another newsletter I think is great at sharing, I’ll commit this 25% of my list to say, you can find me here.


Homework

This month’s homework is easy. Leave a comment and share one thing that someone else is doing that you love.


Extra credit? Share something every day that you love. Someone else’s post, project, or creative output. It costs you nothing and will create new connections that will surprise you.


Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube and visit my website for more info!

 

Marc Scheff, Life Designer

Marc Scheff works with people to design lives beyond what they think is possible. As a child he saw first hand what shifts in perspective and mindset can create even against difficult odds. He now dedicates his time to working with high-level creators and entrepreneurs to create well beyond the success they've had and into the success they've dreamed about. His purpose is to unleash creativity, and he has had the distinct pleasure of doing with work with a healthcare exec, a museum curator, an advisor to the president, and hundreds more.

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