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How To Reframe Rejection

Meagan Brody is a Relationship and Communications Coach who helps her clients connect better within their own relationships and helps those looking for a relationship find the right partner. Although she studied Psychology, for ten years she worked in fashion pursuing the creative side of marketing.

 
Executive Contributor Meagan Brody

Society has taught us that feeling rejected is a bad thing. Even the word itself sounds bad; it sounds close enough to ejection. However, I’m going to tell you how you can appreciate rejection and use rejection to your advantage. 


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Why is rejection deemed a bad feeling?

We are brought up thinking that rejection means we are unwanted, unloved, and not cared for. No matter where that rejection comes from, a lover, a parent, or even a job opportunity, it doesn’t feel good. Post rejection we get caught up in some form of depression and self-doubt about how good we are at something or how much we have to offer. Rejection makes us think twice about ourselves. It has the potential to stop us from trying new things or trying things again. It is a relative to failure and the fear of rejection can lead to feeling like we have failed at something. The fear of not wanting to be shut down by rejection leaves us scared to take risks. This is the cycle of rejection ruling our lives when we look at rejection in a bad light. 


How can we be grateful for rejection?

First things first, we must understand that everything that happens is meant for us. That break up that was out of your control? That “perfect” job you didn’t get? Those friends you thought you would have forever? Yeah, those were all blessings even though we are taught that they were bad experiences. When we look at a rejection and want to reframe it, we need to look at the positive attributes that come out of that “bad experience”. Quite honestly, it is hard to do that in the moment, especially when you really want something to happen for yourself. However, if we reframe the thought of “this rejection is a failure” into “this didn’t work out, so that better opportunities can work out” then we are changing our whole mindset on the idea of rejection. 


What can we learn from rejection?

Things that are not meant for us, in our journey of life, will feel like rejection. Rejection is a hidden opportunity, a chance to find what is meant for us. When we are rejected by one thing, the doors of opportunity for ourselves open in abundance. What if things turned out even better than we had imagined? There is nothing that can stunt our own growth like letting rejection get to our heads. Rejection is the saving grace for better options in the future. Rejection is the arm pushing you in the right direction. Rejection is the muscle that makes us stronger, that knows we can face failure and head down the path that is meant for us, the right path. Rejection is redirection. Next time you think something didn’t work out for you, bring the opportunities of that rejection to life. 


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Meagan Brody, Relationship and Communications Coach

Meagan Brody is a Relationship and Communications Coach who helps her clients connect better within their own relationships and helps those looking for a relationship find the right partner. Although she studied Psychology, for ten years she worked in fashion pursuing the creative side of marketing. As she has transitioned into Life Coaching, she has realized that her creative abilities have helped her clients in reaching their full potential; whether that be in their relationships, personal growth or confidence in the real world. Meagan is NLP Certified (Neuro-Linguistics Programming) and has used these techniques to help her clients with various mindset goals.

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