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When HR Surveys And Employee Perspectives Are Misaligned

Written by: Narghiza Ergashoval, CPA, EMBA, Executive Contributor

Executive Contributors at Brainz Magazine are handpicked and invited to contribute because of their knowledge and valuable insight within their area of expertise.

 
Executive Contributor Narghiza Ergashoval

What is people or human analytics? It's a way to use data about what employees do at work in order to change how effectively the company operates. Ben Waber, President and CEO of Humanyze, who invented this technique says that it differs from traditional methods such as annual surveys or polls because there are no Group Manager Questions (GMRs) asked during these sessions; instead behavioral information on everything an employee does throughout their shift or day, including things they may not think are important, is recorded by sensors installed around buildings and (or) on people.


Woman hand writing on clipboard with a pen

This all sounds a bit invasive, but Waber insists that it's not. The data collected is anonymous and used to improve things like the layout of the office, or to identify which team members work best together. "It's not about watching people," he says. "It's about making the workplace better for everyone."


The benefits are clear but there are also some potential pitfalls.


The first is that people analytics is still in its early days, which means that it's not always accurate or could be far more accurate than typical HR surveys and tools.


The second potential pitfall is more serious: people analytics could be used to micromanage employees. If your boss knows exactly how long you take to write a report or how many emails you send each day, they might start to question why you're not working harder or faster.


This is a legitimate concern, but it's one that Waber says can be avoided by using people analytics the right way. "The data should be used to empower employees, not control them," he says.


It's important to note that while surveys and polls can be a good way of getting an idea about how employees feel, they don't measure what people really think or believe. This means it may not actually reflect reality as much because perception versus truth often differs from one person’s opinion vs another individual who has been polled in exactly similar circumstances with regard their own experiences at work or there's always a chance that the sample size adopted for polls was too small and therefore cannot represent opinions accurately or employees were intimidated to express their true opinions.


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Read more on the subject line in the comments section below.



Surveys are only snapshot in time, but employee engagement is a journey; the biggest source of strength in a workplace for employees is often each other not HR with Narghiza Ergashova, CPA, EMBA Founder of The Golden Ritual What is people or human analytics? It's a way to use data about what employees do at work in order change how effectively the company operates. Ben Waber, President and CEO of Humanyze, who invented this technique says that it differs from traditional methods such as annual surveys or polls because there are no Group Manager Questions (GMRs) asked during these sessions; instead behavioral information on everything an employee does throughout their shift or day, including things they may not think are important, is recorded by sensors installed around buildings and (or) on people. This all sounds a bit invasive, but Waber insists that it's not. The data collected is anonymous and used to improve things like the layout of the office, or to identify which team members work best together. "It's not about watching people," he says. "It's about making the workplace better for everyone." The benefits are clear - but there are also some potential pitfalls. The first is that people analytics is still in its early days, which means that it's not always accurate or could be far more accurate than typical HR surveys and tools. The second potential pitfall is more serious: people analytics could be used to micromanage employees. If your boss knows exactly how long you take to write a report or how many emails you send each day, they might start to question why you're not working harder or faster. This is a legitimate concern, but it's one that Waber says can be avoided by using people analytics the right way. "The data should be used to empower employees, not control them," he says. It's important to note that while surveys and polls can be a good way of getting an idea about how employees feel, they don't measure what people really think or believe. This means it may not actually reflect reality as much because perception versus truth often differs from one person’s opinion vs another individual who has been polled in exactly similar circumstances with regard their own experiences at work or there's always a chance that the sample size adopted for polls was too small and therefore cannot represent opinions accurately or employees were intimidated to express their true opinions. Read more on the subject line in the comments section below. Narghiza Ergashova, CPA, EMBA.


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Narghiza Ergashoval Brainz Magazine
 

Narghiza Ergashoval, CPA, EMBA, Executive Contributor Brainz Magazine

Experienced finance executive with significant achievements in property, mining, resources, chemicals, manufacturing, infrastructure, construction, and engineering. Demonstrated ability to manage sophisticated portfolios and drive targeted performance through business partnerships. Strong negotiator focused on achieving win-win outcomes and expertise in building effective relationships with stakeholders. Personable, articulate, and highly motivated individual with a keen focus on achieving broader business objectives

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