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7 Lessons From Architecture That Can Change Your Life

Written by: Kamil Shah, Executive Contributor

Executive Contributors at Brainz Magazine are handpicked and invited to contribute because of their knowledge and valuable insight within their area of expertise

When mentioning Architecture, images of flamboyant structures, skyscrapers or Renaissance buildings come to mind. Like many other design disciplines, Architecture is not only a reflection of the freedom of social and cultural psyche, it can actually be used as a tool of influence (think Totalitarian Architecture).


Architecture has played a vital role in not only my professional development, but more importantly in my personal growth. I have to admit, the journey through Architecture education and practice was one filled with joy and challenges. A mix of curiosity, excitement, energy and sacrifices along the way. It has taught me profound life lessons, and if I could re-write my journey, I would not want to change a single line from the story. Architecture has enriched my life and changed the way I approach it.


This article will explore the key lessons that Architecture has taught me, and I hope that it will be of great use in its application in your life as it did in mine.


Lesson #1 : Architecture taught me to be more curious and remove my obsession with pre-conceived ideas.


One of the toughest (but most valuable) lesson I’ve learnt from my Architecture education came in the form of a ‘shock-and-awe’ scenario. Yes, I was shocked, and I was awed, not so much by the fact that it was one of the greatest lessons I would have learned, but more so by the audacity in the way in which it had happened. Let me explain.


I had just sat down with my supervisor for a meeting to examine my work of a physical scale model of architects Herzog & De Meuron’s ‘Stone House’ in Italy. It was something which I had put a good amount of time and energy into, and labored over a couple of weeks to make. It was just perfect (so I told myself!). Half way through the session, my supervisor was silent and observed the model from different angles. He paused.